Jews Versus the Alt Right: Lessons from History

Already there has been some dispute within the Alt Right regarding the ideological position of anti-Semitism. More specifically, Milo Yiannopoulos and Allum Bokhair, a homosexual Jew and a Pakistani respectively, penned a Breitbart piece in March of this year in which they implied association with, if not leadership of, the Alt Right. The article claimed that the Alt Right was essentially a reinvention of 1960s counter-culture that was driven by “fun, transgression, and a challenge to social norms.” Yiannopoulos and Bokhair contrast the young jokers of the Alt Right (as they define it) with “anti-Semites, white supremacists, and other members of the Stormfront set,” the latter described as “the worst dregs of human society.” Anti-Semitism, to the extent that it features at all in this narrative, is merely a punchline in the Alt Right’s expansive arsenal of provocative but largely insincere humor. Real ‘racists’ aren’t part of the movement at all.

Contrary to this narrative, it seems barely debateable that for the majority of those involved in the Alt Right, the question of Jewish influence is a genuine concern. And to some of us, the pushing of sanitized movement narratives by Yiannopoulos and Bokhair, and the disproportionate media attention given to these racially and ideologically suspect individuals, is evidence of an attempt to co-opt the Alt Right and divert it from a path of ethnic nationalism. The Daily Stormer has been at the forefront of this reaction, with one article arguing that:

The Alt Right has become such a major political force that it was impossible for [Jewish elites] to continue ignoring us. Our victories have become far too numerous to count. Their new strategy is to try and redefine the Alt Right as a movement led by the homosexual Jew Milo Yiannapolous. They’ve actually been setting this narrative up for a while but are only now choosing to go full force with it… The Jews want the general public to believe that the Alt Right is some kind of goofy White nationalist movement that has no real issue with Jews or homosexuals. They want people to think that the negative things we say about Jews are meant as innocent jokes. This is entirely false. . . .

Steven Beller writes that during the rise of German nationalism in 1860–1880, Jews attempted to take key roles in the movement with a view to re-directing it from its roots in volkisch philosophy and an antagonism towards Jewish influence, and towards a mission of “cultural and social revolution.”[1] Media promotion and careful networking even led to two Jews, Victor Adler and Heinrich Friedjung, vying for leadership of the German nationalist movement in Austria. Indeed, Adler and Friedjung were two of the five framers of the famous Linz Program of 1882, a political platform that called for the complete Germanization of the Austrian state. It was only due to the continued insistence of the non-Jewish movement leaders, particularly Georg Schönerer, that an ethnic version of German nationalism was eventually adhered to. On Schönerer’s insistence, and to the dismay of the erstwhile Jewish “leaders,” the movement adopted an “Aryan clause.” Their attempt to co-opt the movement having failed, Beller adds, “the Jewish reaction was to look elsewhere for their goals of social and cultural change.”[2] For example, Adler became an out and out Marxist overnight. . . .

In all cases, both Trumpism and the Alt Right are portrayed by Jews as a foreign incursion into American political life. As with other tactics, these have a long lineage. Kevin MacDonald writes that “Jewish organizations in Germany in the period 1870–1914 argued that anti-Semitism was a threat to all of Germany because it was fundamentally ‘un-German.’” In nineteenth-century Germany, anti-Semitism was often described by Jews as a French import. Conversely, Paula Hyman writes that, faced with a rise in anti-Jewish feeling in nineteenth-century France, Jews spread the message that anti-Semitism was “un-French” and a “German import.” Thorsten Wagner reports that it was a common refrain among Jews in Denmark that anti-Semitism there was “a German import — without autochthonous roots and traditions.” . . .

http://www.theoccidentalobserver.net/2016/09/jews-versus-the-alt-right-lessons-from-history/

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